Small aircraft, big impact.


Project Phoenix is a world’s first.

Phoenix is the world’s first liquid hydrogen fuel cell aircraft and the first to fully implement a boundary layer suction system. Not only do we reduce emissions by decreasing drag by almost 10%, we remove the emissions altogether by powering our aircraft with the lightest of all elements: hydrogen.

We know that Phoenix will not stay a world’s first for very long, but that is fine with us. We firmly believe our efforts will help kick-start the development of commercial, hydrogen-powered aircraft to make our skies more green.

Phoenix 1:3


Liquid hydrogen

1kg

Wingspan

5.7m

Range

500km

Crew

0

Weight

50kg

Endurance

7 hours

Phoenix FS


Liquid hydrogen

10kg

Wingspan

18m

Range

2000km

Crew

2

Weight

1100kg

Endurance

10 hours

Phoenix 1:3


Liquid hydrogen

1kg

Wingspan

5.7m

Range

500km

Crew

0

Weight

50kg

Endurance

7 hours

Phoenix FS


Liquid hydrogen

10kg

Wingspan

18m

Range

2000km

Crew

2

Weight

1100kg

Endurance

10 hours

Phoenix 1:3


Liquid hydrogen

1kg

Wingspan

5.7m

Range

500km

Crew

0

Weight

50kg

Endurance

8 hours

Phoenix FS


Liquid hydrogen

10kg

Wingspan

18m

Range

2000km

Crew

2

Weight

1100kg

Endurance

10 hours

Hydrogen propulsion


The 1:3 scale prototype is powered by a 1500W fuel cell coupled with a battery pack for take-off power and safety. Hydrogen is kept in a cryogenic tank at -253°C and warmed to 0°C using a complex tubing system.

Hydrogen propulsion


The 1:3 scale prototype is powered by a 1500W fuel cell coupled with a battery pack for take-off power and safety. Hydrogen is kept in a cryogenic tank at -253°C and warmed to 0°C using a complex tubing system.

Hydrogen propulsion


The 1:3 scale prototype is powered by a 1500W fuel cell coupled with a battery pack for take-off power and safety. Hydrogen is kept in a cryogenic tank at -253°C and warmed to 0°C using a complex tubing system.

Fly long, and far


Powered by an electric motor on its tail, Phoenix is able to fly for 7h with just 1kg of liquid hydrogen, covering a distance of more than 500km. These endurance and range values are unmatched by batteries and conventional fuels.

Fly long, and far


Powered by an electric motor on its tail, Phoenix is able to fly for 7h with just 1kg of liquid hydrogen, covering a distance of more than 500km. These endurance and range values are unmatched by batteries and conventional fuels.

Fly long, and far


Powered by an electric motor on its tail, Phoenix is able to fly for 7h with just 1kg of liquid hydrogen, covering a distance of more than 500km. These endurance and range values are unmatched by batteries and conventional fuels.

Why hydrogen?


A number of solutions to the sustainable aviation problem have been advocated in the past. Broadly speaking, these solutions fit into three categories: kerosene equivalents, batteries and hydrogen. Biofuels and synthetic kerosene, although a potential temporary solution to the aviation industry’s carbon emissions, are not sustainable in the long-term. The impact on air quality as a result of NOx emissions by combusting kerosene or kerosene equivalents is up to 4.4 times higher than the impact of CO2 emissions on the environment.

Batteries are not suited for aviation on their own due to their weight. However, battery and hydrogen technologies are closely linked since both make use of the same electric engines. Hydrogen in gaseous and liquid state as well as contained in carrier fluids is seen by many to be the long-term solution. A single wind turbine would be able to provide the power for a commercial aircraft. Fuel cell technology has the potential to change not only aviation but transportation in general, leading to a sustainable, future hydrogen economy.

Why hydrogen?


A number of solutions to the sustainable aviation problem have been advocated in the past. Broadly speaking, these solutions fit into three categories: kerosene equivalents, batteries and hydrogen.

Kerosene equivalents

Biofuels and synthetic kerosene, although a potential temporary solution to the aviation industry’s carbon emissions, are not sustainable in the long-term. The impact on air quality as a result of NOx emissions by combusting kerosene or kerosene equivalents is up to 4.4 times higher than the impact of CO2 emissions on the environment.

Batteries

Batteries are not suited for aviation on their own due to their weight. However, battery and hydrogen technologies are closely linked since both make use of the same electric engines.

Hydrogen

Hydrogen in gaseous and liquid state as well as contained in carrier fluids is seen by many to be the long-term solution. A single wind turbine would be able to provide the power for a commercial aircraft. Fuel cell technology has the potential to change not only aviation but transportation in general, leading to a sustainable, future hydrogen economy.

Boundary Layer Suction


Since the very beginning of aviation, there has been a constant strive for maximum efficiency. However, in recent years, improvements in efficiency have become increasingly minor. It’s time for something radical.

Boundary layer suction aims to reduce drag by maintaining an attached and laminar boundary layer over the wings. 500,000 holes, each with a diameter of 0.12mm, are lasered into the upper surface of the wing. Air is sucked through these holes using a pump in the fuselage, reducing the profile drag by a staggering 50%.

Timeline


In July 2021, Phoenix will make its maiden voyage. From September 2020, work will begin on a full-scale, two-person hydrogen-powered aircraft: Phoenix FS. A gaseous hydrogen-powered aircraft is set to fly in 2022, followed by its liquid hydrogen counterpart in 2024.

The Future

2025: First hydrogen-powered flight around the world

2030: First commercial, hydrogen-powered aircraft.

Scalability


Although our aircraft are small, our ambition is not. For example, we are working internationally to develop certification guidelines for hydrogen propulsion. We firmly believe that our work can be used to have the first hydrogen-powered passenger aircraft such as the Greenliner, shown above, flying by 2030, potentially by a spin-off start-up.

The Greenliner >

Your clean sky


We are always looking for partners to go on this adventure with us. Find out more about the possibilities of getting involved here.

Learn more >

Your clean sky


We are always looking for partners to go on this adventure with us. Find out more about the possibilities of getting involved here.

Learn more >

Your clean sky


We are always looking for partners to go on this adventure with us. Find out more about the possibilities of getting involved here.

Learn more >